'Herbig Tree Children's Picture Book'

Project prome image 02 herbig

Sharing the unique German pioneering immigrant family story with children

This project did not receive enough votes to be funded.

Project details

Suggested by David

Sponsored by J. F. Herbig Memorial Family Incorporated

Budget

$12,500.00

54 votes received

The Herbig Family Tree has been recognised for many years as a major attraction for thousands of tourists annually and, importantly, is a major part of the Springton German Heritage Excursion for primary and secondary school students. Introducing young children to the existence of the ‘Tree’ and the Herbig family history is important. The Children’s Picture Book addresses the challenges faced and overcome in settling into a completely different environment and laying the foundations for the huge contribution early German immigrants made to the prosperity and culture of South Australia in a way it will be easily understood by children.

This project did not receive enough votes to be funded.

Project details

Suggested by David

Sponsored by J. F. Herbig Memorial Family Incorporated

Budget

$12,500.00

54 votes received

Comments

Comments closed

Community Member

13 Nov 2017

EARLY HISTORY of the HERBIG TREE

This project should not be funded unless it acknowledges the full history of the tree.

The Herbigs came to the tree in 1855, which was after the local Aboriginal tribe, the Peramangk, appear to have fled the district following the spread of disease. Even before Adelaide was settled in 1836, Captain Sturt had seen extensive evidence of smallpox, which spread down the River Murray from the eastern states, and was widely fatal.

This tree was originally a winter dwelling for Peremangk families. In this district and others, camp fires were lit on the side of a tree that gave shelter from the wind. In time, a hollow burned into the base of the tree.

Once there was a good hollow, the tree trunk was used as the base for a wurlie. Large sheets of bark and animal skins were stretched over branches on each side of the tree. The trunk was an anchor for a bigger shelter which would not easily blow down.

The Peramangk moved north and east from their land, from Strathalbyn through Springton to Truro, soon after white settlement in 1836. This tree, and others like it in other places, were then used by white settlers as a foundation for their own first shelters. Both the settlers and Aboriginal people could recognise a very practical idea!

These wonderful old ‘family trees’ are hard to find, but they carry the history of all our country's ancestors.

Integrating this information into the picture book makes a richer and more interesting story, with broader interest beyond the Herbig family. The history details are not needed (I’ve included them for information) but how the tree was made and used is essential. Ignoring it is not acceptable, in all fairness.

Project Owner

David Herbig > Community Member

20 Nov 2017

Thank you for your very insightful comments; we are very aware of the original past of the tree, however I’ll let the author know, and as the book is only in progress, check about proposed content concerning the tree before the Herbig’s arrival.
Your comment is very much appreciated.

Jill Dearman

12 Nov 2017

What a great way to keep the Herbig tree alive - as a child i was always astounded how many lived in the grand ol' girl - we need our history accessible for the young and not so young - i would love to be able to give a picture book to friends young children telling them about the famous tree in Springton the town i grew up in and still live in

John Flavel

01 Nov 2017

An Important piece of history. Assists in giving a broader perspective to young and old re early settlement life encounters and or expectations.